Apr 24, 2017

Providence art book and slipcase on Kickstarter

Art by Jacen Burrows.
Avatar launched a Kickstarter campaign to produce a Providence art book and complete slipcase set.
At the moment of writing the campaign has been already funded with more than $94,000 pledged of $8,300 goal.
More details here.
Art by Jacen Burrows.

Apr 17, 2017

Dr. John Dee: The first 007

In March The Confidentials published a "magic list of mystics and magicians" written by Moore. Below you can read what he wrote regarding Dr. John Dee.
The complete list is available HERE.

Dr. John Dee (1527-1609): The first 007
This Elizabethan magus is, for my money, the most creative and influential practitioner of magic who has ever existed. A brilliant 16th century mathematician and astronomer/astrologer, adviser to Queen Elizabeth I,  Dee (literally) wrote the book on navigation that helped to establish Britain’s famous sea power; coined the phrase “British Empire” and suggested its implementation, to Elizabeth, in the colonising of America.
  • He provided the basis for most modern Western thought with simply the books that remained in his Mortlake library once the mob were done with it;
  • Was the inspiration for Ben Jonson’s Alchemist, Marlowe’s Faust and Shakespeare’s Prospero;
  • Served as a secret agent in Francis Walsingham’s prototypical British Intelligence under the code name/number 007;
  • Greatly improved the design of Manchester while losing most of his family to the plague;
  • Spent most of his later life in communication with entities that he diplomatically referred to as “angels”, and who had revealed the complex structure of their universe and their “Enochian” language to Dee and his sometime partner, Edward Kelly through the agency of a crystal ball or scrying mirror.
John Dee pretty much built the modern world that we exist in, and his Enochian magical system at least appears to work if approached according to his instructions. They don’t make magicians like that any more.

[The complete list is available HERE.]

Apr 16, 2017

Alan Moore by Gianluca Costantini

Art by Gianluca Costantini.
Above, Alan Moore portrayed by Italian comic artist and graphic journalist Gianluca Costantini during the Comica festival in 2008.

Apr 4, 2017

Brian K. Vaughan on Providence

Providence
Brian K. Vaughan compiled a list of ten of his favorite recent graphic novels "that take advantage of comics’ unique ability to explore the world and ourselves in ways that no other visual medium can." Providence is included in.
The complete list is available HERE.

Providence, by Alan Moore and Jacen Burrows
The greatest writer in the history of comics is doing some of his finest work ever with artist Jacen Burrows and their harrowing exploration of Lovecraft. [Brian K. Vaughan]

Apr 2, 2017

Sam Kieth, Alan Moore and... The Maxx

From The Maxx minicomics included as exclusive supplement to Wizard magazine n. 51, 1995.

When I called Alan Moore to help kick off this new story line in Maxx, to say I was nervous is putting it mildly. But I wanted the chance to work with him even more than I was intimidated. I asked him if he'd gotten the comics I sent, and he politely assured me he'd gotten through all 16 issues, and that he really enjoyed them. I was trying to think of what I could possibly do to get him to consent to do this one issue – beg/plead/manipulate – but he said, “Sure”. He said that a lot of issues of The Maxx are paralleling things he's interested in his own life right now. We talked about our interest in Aleister Crowley and the English tradition of ceremonial magick, Carlos Castaneda, spirit animals and Jung.
I told him my concern about being too specific in The Maxx, about how I wanted to let people read what they wanted to into it, instead of getting caught up in dogma. It's eerie to meet somebody who has so completely and thoroughly studied the same subjects and interests I have.
So, I said, trying to sound casual but curious as hell, “What happens? Who is Sara ten years from now?” There was a pause and I felt my blood run cold. In his deep voice, Alan said “Something has happened; something's gone wrong on the Outback. It's building, and may or may not be bad, sort of like the REM song, “It's the end ofthe world as we know it, and I fell fine.”
Then he mentioned a dream he had in which tiny dolls were eating the landscape, and I flashed on the exploding fairies I had envisioned in Sara's Outback. As the conversation came to a close, we both agreed that the future was gonna be a lot worse and uglier, both in the book and in the real world, but leaving me with an odd sense that, somehow, that's OK. [Sam Kieth]

The Maxx is a series created by Sam Kieth and originally published in the 90ies by Image Comics.
Moore is credited for the dialogues in The Maxx n.21.

Mar 30, 2017

The Voice of Mandrill

Mandrillifesto!
We’ll put politics in the pillory,
put the art back in artillery.
We can weaponise wonder
and our voice shall be as thunder. 


Mar 28, 2017

Super Weird Moore

Alan Moore portrait by Mal Earl.
Excerpt from an interview conducted by Josh Ray and published on Super Weird Substance site in March 2017. Here you can read the complete piece.

Alan Moore: "I think imagination is one of the single most important qualities, as individuals or as a culture, and certainly has a massive part to play in what happens next. I would caution, though, that imagination in itself can never be enough, and that it is important to understand that imagination only functions perfectly as part of a balanced and integrated system. With only our imagination, it is easy to become lost in fantasies, delusions, crappy superhero movies or dreams of what it will be like when we win the lottery, often to the detriment of our actual reality. As individuals, and thus presumably as a culture, we need to be certain that our imaginings are balanced and modified by both our compassion and our intellect. Then, when they have achieved that state of balance, we must use our applied Will to force them into manifest, material existence in the physical world. Yes, this is Trojan Horse kabbalah and magic, but it’s also the way that everything comes into being, be that a piece of music, a book or a social movement."

Mar 24, 2017

Big Nemo's thumbnails

Thumbnails by Moore.
From Colleen Doran Twitter account, posted the 18th of March, above Alan Moore thumbnails and notes for Electricomics' Big Nemo.
The final story has been drawn by Colleen Doran with colours by José Villarrubia.

Mar 12, 2017

Faith No More

A frame from Act of Faith short movie.

AMY: Still touching on Faith, I loved the Faith No More CD in the film.
MOORE: I’m glad you noticed that! We tried to pay attention to everything. Like the bottle of vodka she puts down is Tunguska, which is where, in 1908, a meteor or something, impacted and completely devastated the area. It looked like a nuclear attack. So we thought, “Tunguska Vodka: It will flatten you.” Everything that you see is something that we invented, with the exception of the Faith No More CD. It was an irresistible pun.

[The complete interview is available HERE.]

Mar 9, 2017

Alan Moore by Doogie Horner

Art by Doogie Horner.

Above, an intense portrait sketch of Alan Moore by comedian, writer and artist Doogie Horner.
More info about him here.

Feb 22, 2017

The music of Alan Moore (in 2002)

Excerpt from a small interview published in Mojo magazine N.99, February 2002. 

[...] Mojo: What, if push comes to shove, is your all-time favourite album? 
"The Humors of..." by Lewis Furey. He’s an American artist who did a couple of albums, "Lewis Furey", and "The Humors of Lewis Furey". He was obviously influenced by the David Bowie glam scene, disco and leftfield Brecht stuff. 

[...] Mojo: What do you sing in the shower? 
Alan Moore: Most of my house is a hovel, but my bathroom is like something Alexander the Great would soak in. l was doing The Smiths yesterday, "How Soon ls Now?" l also tend to find meself doing Elvis Costello, Warren Zevon - it was "Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner" a couple of days ago.

Feb 15, 2017

Feb 14, 2017

Alan Moore talks Doctor Who!

Vworp Vworp! Vol. 3 (cover by Martin Geraghty).
From editor Colin Brockhurst:
Volume 3 of Vworp Vworp!: exclusive in-depth interview with world’s greatest comics writer Alan Moore, free Dalek CD, new comic strips, and much more!
We’re back and this time with a special bumper 208-page edition! In this issue, we explore Alan Moore’s Doctor Who backup strips, published in Doctor Who Weekly and Monthly in 1980 and 1981. Featuring the Cybermen, the Autons and the Time Lords, these strips were not only Alan’s very first professional work, but would go on to influence both comics and Doctor Who in ways he could never have foreseen.
Here, Alan recalls his 1980 tale, Black Legacy: “I decided that if I couldn’t use Daleks then the next biggest Doctor Who enemy would probably be the Cybermen... As I understood it, the main part of the Cybermen ethos was efficiency, and a kind of a hygiene. Physical and mental disease would be completely unknown to the Cybermen. So I thought, what if there was something that could reintroduce these forgotten terrors to this race that has evolved beyond the fear of mental and physical illness?”

Vworp Vworp! is edited and designed by Colin Brockhurst
Published by Gareth Kavanagh/Malevilus Publications

You can buy a copy HERE.

Feb 13, 2017

SHITTY WATCHMEN!


Shitty Watchmen is a formalist exercise analyzing the language of comics as utilized by Alan Moore and, more importantly, Dave Gibbons. Created by Dave Baker, Nicole Goux, Rachel Dukes, Malachi Ward, Nick Diaz, Emilie Vo, Sam Ancona, Chuck Kerr, Colby Bluth, Robert Negrete, and Sabrina Deigert, Shitty Watchmen seeks to scrutinize the masterful use of composition and panel breakdown within the most undeniably complex comic book ever created. The means by which these staggering artistic achievements are deconstructed? Super shitty drawings.

Thus...

Shitty Watchmen.
 
You can buy the book here; archive is available here.

Feb 3, 2017

Moore and Knockabout in 2017 (and beyond)

A page from Lost Girls. Art by Melinda Gebbie.
Excerpt from Brit Comics rock - Graphic novels coming from UK publishers in 2017 posted in Forbidden Planet blog.

[...] Tony [Bennett] from Knockabout warns us that these dates are rough at the moment, but of course we’ll have more on them closer to publication times:

Lost Girls, by Melinda Gebbie (expected October)
This will be a new edition, complete with a new cover and some thirty two new pages of art as well. 352 pages hardback. 30.5 x 23 cm. isbn 9780861662609

These titles are in the planning stage but there’s no fixed date quite yet:
[...] Absolute League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Century, by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neil (date tbc)
This is probably a goer again, having been previously dismissed but happily now seems to be back on the planning board..

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volume 4, by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill
This will be serialised as six comics, but no start date is sorted as yet. Alan has the story in his head but has yet to write it, so it may not be until very late 2017. (again I’m pretty sure we – and probably every other comics site! – will be mentioning this one again when publication details are firmer)

Jan 30, 2017

Watchmen 3

Excerpt from an interview conducted by Mike Cotton and published on Wizard Zero magazine in 2003.

WIZARD: What's going on with Watchmen 3?
Alan Moore: Excuse me?

Well, everyone always asks about Watchmen 2 so I figure I'd move on.
That's very clever. [Chuckles]

Jan 20, 2017

America’s Best Comics Artist Edition

America’s Best Comics Artist Edition.
Excerpt from JH Williams III site.

[...] It features an array of original art reproductions of numerous America’s Best Comics stories, including the infamous Promethea #10 unedited. Which has my work in it. And there is a small surprise of something in there previously unpublished involving that same issue." 

America’s Best Comics Artist Edition is published by IDW

Jan 10, 2017

Comic Book Legends: Alan Moore and Dez Skinn

The naked artist.
Excerpt from page 96 of The Naked Artist...And Other Comic Book Legends, a fantastic and hilarious book written by Bryan Talbot and illustrated by Hunt Emerson, published in 2007 by Moonstone (an expanded edition has been released in 2014). 

[...] During a Forbidden Planet party one night at UKCAC I was propping up the bar after several pints when Dez [Skinn] ambled over, equally sozzled, and the talk turned to Alan.
"Listen Dez," I ventured, "the British comic industry isn't big enough for this falling out. It needs Alan working in Warrior. You must sort out your differences."
He was nodding sagely at this as Alan arrived in the pub in the company of Karen Berger, who'd just taken him out for dinner, having headhunted him for DC.
"Look," I said to Dez, "there's Alan. Now's your chance! Go over and make it up with him!"
He looked at me, determined.
"By God! You're right! I'll do!" he said and strode over to Alan, who stopped stock still and stared stonily down at him from his great hairy height.
"Alan," Dez began, "I'm sorry if I've done anything to offend you. We need to continue our work together. Let's put aside our differences. Let's be friends."
Alan regarded him gravely.
"Dez," he rumbled.
"Yes?"
"Fuck off."

Jan 4, 2017

Alan Moore's letter from... 1968!

Journey Planet 31.
Excerpt from a previously unpublished Alan Moore's letter sent to Irish comics fanzine Heroes Unlimited in late 1968, shortly after his 15th birthday. 
The letter has been included in Journey Planet 31- Tony Roche & Merry Marvel Fanzine/Heroes Unlimited! (pdf available here), a special issue co-edited by Moore's renown scholar Pádraig Ó Méalóid.

Alan Moore: [...] As regards your other new feature, the controversy spot (incidentally the Wertham argument was groovy, fantastic, great, etc) I like it, and for further features you could enter into the D.C/Marvel feud, or discuss the merits of the Golden Age comics, as opposed to todays mags.
One more thing (can I hear sighs of relief?) why not have an article or two on the newspaper strips, British and American. I think it would probably be even better than the other idea I was going to propose: “Captain Remus Discovers the Alan Moore!” No? Oh well!
[...]

Read the whole story here.

Jan 2, 2017

Paul Rivoche and Moore's scripts

Art by Paul Rivoche.
Excerpt from an interview with Canadian artist PAUL RIVOCHE published on ImageTexT site in 2016. The complete interview is available here.

Paul Rivoche: [...] Drawing comics is a lot of work, and if you're stuck drawing out someone else's visions, they'd better be interesting and well-crafted, because you have to live inside them for a good long while. But in my admittedly limited experiences with production-line comics, most scripts I was handed weren't that well-crafted. Some, such as Alan Moore's of course, were . . . they were a joy to work on, professional; he understands what an artist needs, even if his scene descriptions do tend to go on at great length!